Worlds apart

There has been much analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of both analogue and digital media since the changeover to digital around twelve or thirteen years ago, but what is becoming increasingly evident is that some photographers simply prefer the look of film for many subjects, as it often has the ability to enhance the appearance of a scene in a way that is not achievable from a digital file, even with film simulation software such as DX0.

The two images below were shot within minutes of each other and no enhancements or radical modifications were made to either shot. In-camera settings for high contrast subjects (such as Nikon's 'D lighting') may bring out additional shadow detail but have the effect of lowering the overall contrast of a digital photograph - an image which already does not posess the richness of film anyway.   The inherent flatness of digital really requires a series of adjustments to the image in the editing stage and appears to become all the more obvious when a side-by-side comparison is made;  and is something our eyes have now become conditioned to over the last decade or so. 

  Kodak Ektar 100 colour neg 35mm, 18mb mini-lab scan

 

Kodak Ektar 100 colour neg 35mm, 18mb mini-lab scan

  Nikon D300s, 14 bit RAW processed in Nikon Capture NXD, standard camera settings  

 

Nikon D300s, 14 bit RAW processed in Nikon Capture NXD, standard camera settings